How did the Ping G700 irons compare to the G400?

Golf Equipment

The long-awaited upgrades for the GMax irons pack a serious punch. But how do they compare with the G400? Equipment editor James Savage puts them head-to-head

Our initial Ping G700 irons review took place at the Pete Cowen Golf Academy in Rotherham.

We then took them to Saadiyat Beach in Abu Dhabi where we put them head-to-head with the Ping G400 irons.

Ping G700 irons vs. Ping G400 irons – First impressions

When I first learned about these irons, I assumed they would be replacing the Ping GMax irons which were launched a couple of years ago.

Ping have two-year product cycles so you can usually work out what is coming next.

Ping G700 irons

But when I pulled these out of the box, my first reaction was ‘wow’.

Has there ever been a super game-improvement iron which looks as good as the Ping G700? I’m not sure there has been.

Yes, it’s still large with a thick topline and a fair bit of offset but it just looks fantastic – so much style and shelf appeal.

I’ve compared them with a G400 iron below and you can see they are a bit larger. Ping G700 are on the right.

Ping G700 irons

Ping G700 irons vs. Ping G400 irons – The technology

So in the Ping G700 irons we have a hollow construction here with a thin maraging steel face.

Ping say it’s their longest and highest-flying iron to date. To me they looked and felt a bit like mini G400 Crossovers.

“The desire for golfers to hit their irons farther continues to grow,” said Ping’s president John K. Solheim.

“We want to provide options that greatly increase distance without sacrificing other performance attributes, such as consistency, forgiveness and feel. With the G700 iron, we’ve been able to accomplish all of that in a very appealing design with a sound that screams distance from the moment golfers hit it.”

Ping G700 irons

The hollow-body construction of the 17-4 stainless steel head allows for an internal geometry design that positions weight away from the face, creating a frame for metal-wood-like flexing.

Maraging steel, which is also used in the G400 fairway woods, hybrids and crossovers, is one of the strongest alloys in the world and is commonly employed in the aerospace industry.

Ping say those properties make it an ideal face material to deliver more flexing for faster ball speeds that launch shots farther and higher.

“We’re seeing significant ball-speed increases in the G700 while maintaining the consistency and control golfers need to improve their iron play,” said Solheim. “It also has a great overall look, especially at address, and a premium finish. When golfers hit it, they’ll experience a sensation and sound that’s unlike any they’ve ever felt or heard.”

Ping G700 irons vs. Ping G400 irons – The results

When you first start hitting the Ping G700 irons you get even more of that ‘wow’ factor.

They felt very similar to the G400 Crossovers to me and the finish is identical so would blend together fantastically well as a set.

It really does feel like the ball comes screaming off the face. The Ping G700 irons are confidence-inspiring at address but still manage to look inoffensive.

You can notice the hollow construction as the sound and feel isn’t as solid as some irons  we have tested recently (where the cavity has been filled in) but the ball speed numbers were excellent.

We compared them with the Ping G400 irons below.

Ping G700 irons numbers

Ping G700 irons

Ping G400 irons numbers

Ping G700 ironsPing G700 irons review – NCG verdict

Ping G700 irons

There wasn’t a lot to split the G400 and Ping G700 irons from a numbers point of view but we did notice a little extra ball speed with the G700.

I’m very used to the G400 as they were my ‘gamer’ irons at the back end of 2017 so I’m very happy with them and can play consistently with them.

I’m not sure I’ve seen enough data to make me switch them out in favour of the G700 but the initial signs are very positive indeed.

You might get the odd one which jumps out a little further than you might expect but you’re not going to suffer too much of a drop off in carry on the shots where you don’t quite middle it.

The Ping G700 irons flew a bit higher than the G400 and had a bit more spin which is exactly what I’d be wanting to see if I was a player who wanted some extra launch and air-time.

For anyone who plays the GMax irons, I think you’d be mad not to upgrade to the G700 because the looks sound and feel alone make it worthwhile.

Ping G700 irons

And some of the performance benefits were clear to see even after just one hitting session.

Would I switch from the Ping G400 to the Ping G700 irons?

I’m not so sure I would because that high ball flight is amazing in warm, non-windy conditions.

But I live and play most of my golf in the UK. I’d be a bit scared about losing control in the wind with the G700.

But maybe I’ll add the 5 and 4 G700 irons to my G400 set? Definitely something for me to have a think about.

Ping G700 irons details

Available: 4-9, PW, UW, SW
Shaft options: Stock steel shaft — PING AWT 2.0 (R, S, X); Stock graphite shafts — Alta CB (counter-balanced) powered by AWT, UST Recoil 760 ES SMACWRAP (A), UST Recoil 780 ES SMACWRAP (R, S)
Aftermarket steel shaft options (no upcharge): True Temper Dynamic Gold (S300, X100), Dynamic Gold 105 (R300, S300), Dynamic Gold 120 (S300, X100) Project X LZ (5.0, 5.5, 6.0, 6.5), True Temper XP95 (R, S,), Nippon NS Pro Modus 105 (S, X), KBS Tour (R, S, X)

SRP: £149 per iron w/steel shaft; £159 per iron w/graphite shaft

More information can be found on the Ping website.

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