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Ping Blueprint Irons review

Best Ping Irons 2024

Ping are renown for producing some of the finest clubs your money can buy. Here are our pick of the best Ping irons for 2024

 

When it comes to choosing the best golf irons, Ping is a brand that many golfers trust for their high-quality, reliable clubs.

In 2024 Ping has released their new Blueprint range, with the T and S irons. Last year we saw the launch of the G430 irons, which are a strong set of game improvement irons. With the i230 and i525 not long before, both great for mid to low handicappers.

As you can tell with that list, Ping aren’t shy when it comes to producing irons and with a great range to choose from there really is something for every golfer.

Check out our guide to the best ping irons of this year to see which might best suit you…

Best Ping Irons 2024


Ping G430 irons

4.5 star review

Reviewed by Hannah Holden

This club almost looks unrecognisable. Although it has that typical high square-toe Ping shaping, the back of the club head is really different. I love how they have designed the Pwrflex in the back of the club head to give this product a completely new more modern feel.

Over the ball, this is still very typically Ping. It has a big overall shaping, with a decent amount of offset and a thick top line. It is definitely very confidence-inspiring over the golf ball for the higher handicap golfer.

Overall these are some of the most consistent game-improvement irons I have tested this year. Ping has done it again and produced an exceptional game improvement iron that will only aid performance.

Pros:

  • Extremely consistent irons
  • Easy to launch
  • Controllable

Cons:

  • Not as long as other models on the marker


RRP: £150 (steel) £160 (graphite)

Right-handed lofts: 8°, 9°, 10°, 11°

Ping stock shafts: Hzrdus Red CB, Tensei AV Blue with XLink Tech, Hzrdus Black, Tensei 1K Black

Fitted shafts (no upcharge) Graphite Design Tour AD UB, Tour AD DI, Tour AD IZ

More information: Ping Website


Ping Blueprint S Irons

5 star review
Ping Blueprint S Irons Review

Reviewed by Hannah Holden

This is a great-looking iron. I love the small, compact look and the fact there is really minimal offset. It still has that typical ping shape with the slightly higher toe, but I think that gives this smaller iron a look that isn’t intimidating at all.

There was definitely more forgiveness in these than I expected. I especially liked the fact that even on slightly low-on-the-face strikes, I still got enough distance to get the ball to the green. The consistency of my distance was a lot better than I would have expected with the size of these irons, which is obviously important when you are firing into greens.

These were carrying 126.5 yards on average in my simulator testing, which is a tad shy of the 133 yards I would generally get out of my 9-iron, but nothing that couldn’t be fixed with a slight loft tweak.

Overall, I was really impressed with these irons. I knew they would be good in terms of control and workability, but I was concerned about if they would fly far enough to be potential gamers.

Pros:

  • Great compact-looking golf club
  • Really workable
  • Good forgiveness relative to size

Cons:

  • Just suits the better player market


RRP: £200 per iron (steel) £210 per iron (graphite)

Shafts: True Temper Dynamic Gold 120 (S300, X100), PING Alta CB Black graphite (SR, R, S)

Optional Stock Shafts: PING AWT (R, S, X), Dynamic Gold (S300, X100), Dynamic Gold 105 (R300, S300), KBS Tour (R, S, X), Nippon N.S. Pro Modus3 105 (R, S, X), Elevate MPH 95 (R, S), UST Recoil Dart 65 (A), 75 (R, S)

Grip: Golf Pride 360 Tour Velvet in six sizes (Blue -1/16”, Red -1/32”, Aqua -1/64”, White-Std, Gold +1/32”, Orange +1/16”)

Lofts: Standard, Power Spec and Retro Spec

More information: Ping Website


Ping Blueprint T Irons

5 star review
Ping Blueprint T Irons Review

Reviewed by Jack Backhouse

I fell in love with these irons after my first shot. The Blueprint T irons are forged from 8620 carbon steel and just feel so good from the face. I could have continued to hit them long after the test had finished. They didn’t feel harsh and firm like some blades do; the ball felt controlled and spinny from the face, and I liked that.

Our irons testing starts with the 9 iron and I hit five shots that basically landed on top of each other. With a perfect 20-degree launch with 8500rpm of spin, I would be in danger of hitting shots that stop and spin back with these irons, which is something I rarely do. I was impressed at the ball speed and carry these irons produce, for a blade for me 137 yards is pretty solid.

My 5 iron shots carried an average of 185, which is perfect gapping, and again, the Blueprint T irons gave me perfect launch conditions. I really like Ping’s precision milling on the face and grooves, as this really helps me keep the ball up in the air as a natural lowball player.

Overall, I was really impressed with these irons. I knew they would be good in terms of control and workability, but I didn’t know they would feel so good and put out such impressive launch monitor data for a forged blade. These could go straight into my bag as gamers for 2024.

Pros:

  • Great compact-looking golf club
  • Really workable
  • Competitive distance numbers

Cons:

  • Do not miss hit!


RRP: £200 per iron (steel) £210 per iron (graphite)

Shafts: True Temper Dynamic Gold 120 (S300, X100), PING Alta CB Black graphite (SR, R, S)

Optional Stock Shafts: PING AWT (R, S, X), Dynamic Gold (S300, X100), Dynamic Gold 105 (R300, S300), KBS Tour (R, S, X), Nippon N.S. Pro Modus3 105 (R, S, X), Elevate MPH 95 (R, S), UST Recoil Dart 65 (A), 75 (R, S)

Grip: Golf Pride 360 Tour Velvet in six sizes (Blue -1/16”, Red -1/32”, Aqua -1/64”, White-Std, Gold +1/32”, Orange +1/16”)

Lofts: Standard, Power Spec and Retro Spec

More information: Ping Website


Ping i230 irons

4 star review
Ping i230 irons review

Reviewed by Hannah Holden

I can’t get over how much sleeker these look than the previous i210 irons from Ping. The whole club head looks so much more modern and stylish and I also like the overall more compact shaping.

Before Ping released the new i230 model, they were already racking up wins on tour. Straight away when I started hitting these I loved the soft, yet solid, sound and feel and could see why they have ended up in the bags of numerous tour players. It is quite surprising how players like these feel even with the slightly larger sizing.

Across the board, I had a consistent high ball flight. This was great for stopping the ball on the green but into the wind, it sometimes felt slightly excessive.

Overall this was a seriously enjoyable iron to hit. I found I didn’t want to stop testing as the towering ball flight, with its impressive control, was really fun to hit. For players who crave a club that allows them to use their touch and feel and be creative, this is a great option. But also there is an added level of forgiveness that you wouldn’t expect this type of iron to deliver.

Pros:

  • Eye-catching to players
  • Good workability
  • Great spin control

Cons:

  • Not the longest irons


RRP: £180 per iron (steel) £190 per iron (graphite)

Lofts:
Standard 3 – 19°, 4 – 22.5°, 5 – 26°, 6 – 29.5°, 7 – 33°, 8 – 37°, 9 – 41°, PW – 45°, UW – 50°

Retro 3 – 21°, 4 – 24.5°, 5 – 28°, 6 – 31.5°, 7 – 35°, 8 – 39°, 9 – 43°, PW – 47°, UW – 52°

Power 3 – 19°, 4 – 22°, 5 – 25°, 6 – 28°, 7 – 31.5°, 8 – 35.5°, 9 – 40°, PW – 44.5°, UW – 49.5°

Stock shaft: Dynamic Gold 105 and Ping Alta CB Black

More information: Ping website


Ping i525 irons

4 star review
Ping i525 irons review

Reviewed by Dan Murphy

As a long-term user of Ping i500 irons, this was the simplest of transmissions. It was like the first game of a new football season when you go and watch your team and everything is reassuringly familiar – and it turns out you have also signed a world-beating winger and a classy midfielder.

The irons look great in the bag, let alone behind the ball, but you know they are also working really hard for you in terms of the tech.

Having carried my i500s for over three years, I felt like I was ready for a change. While these clubs remain a fantastic fit for me on the launch monitor, I was aware that the feel was a touch harsher than I would ideally like. Sure enough, when I went to Ping HQ at Gainsborough for a fitting, the i500s were doing pretty much everything they should but when I switched to the i525 sample, there was an immediate change of sound and a more buttery feel.

If you’re looking for an iron that is aimed at the better player with appealing aesthetics but you also value forgiveness, then it’s hard to look past the i525s.

Pros:

  • Gorgeous finish and appealing head shape
  • Hot off the face on the longer irons
  • Low-spinning flight that stops your iron shots ballooning in the wind

Cons:

  • Some players may find the spin rates a little too low to maximise carry


RRP: £180 (steel); £190 (graphite)

Standard lofts: 3 – 18, 4 – 21, 5 – 24, 6 – 27, 7 – 30.5, 8 – 35, 9 – 40, PW – 45, GW – 50

Ping stock shafts: Project X 10, AWT 2.0, Alta CB Slate, Alta Distanza Black 40, UST Recoil

Stock shafts: Dynamic Gold, Dynamic Gold 105, Dynamic Gold 120, KBS Tour, NS Pro MODUS 105, True Temper Elevate 95

Grip: Tour Velvet; Tour Velvet Cord; Arccos Smart Caddies (custom only)

More information: Ping website


The Best Ping Irons 2024

Ping really is one of the leading golf brands in the equipment world. Specialling in creating not only great irons but many other high quaility clubs. For more Ping products check out:

How do we test irons?

At National Club Golfer we are passionate about producing accurate and thorough reviews and make sure our testing process is rigorous so we get a good understanding of how each club performs.

Each iron is hit with Pro V1 golf balls to allow us to collect launch monitor data with our in-house TrackMan and Flightscope. After this it is time to head out onto the golf course and test the clubs in practice and competition play. We do this across a variety of golf clubs in our base of Yorkshire.

What is important when buying a new iron?

When buying a new set of irons it is important to know what you want from that club to help you improve.

Most people are looking for more distance, each iron model is optimised for different things. Depending on your swing and your impact conditions, you may not actually hit the model that is advertised as the longest, the furthest. So if you want more distance it is always worth giving different models a hit before you make a decision.

For most golfers, especially high handicappers, something that is more forgiving is going to yield the best performance. Most forgiving golf irons have a slightly bigger club head with perimeter weighting for high MOI. They also have a center of gravity that is further back to help players get more height on their shots.

Do you want something that is draw bias? There are so many models out there to help with slice correction, it would be silly not to take a look if you see your ball disappearing into the right trees too often. A closed face and draw bias weighting can get you hitting straighter shots in no time at all.

Don’t forget about the shaft either. Getting the correct shaft can help dial in your spin, launch angle and can also give you some extra distance. Having a club fitting or trying different options with your local pro can really improve the performance of your new driver.

The Best Ping Irons 2024: FAQ’s

What are the latest Ping irons?

The Blueprint line from Ping is their latest model of irons. The range consists of the Blueprint S, designed for more control and precision to lower scores and the Blueprint T, a compact muscle back blade designed for pinpoint accuracy.

What’s different in the latest Ping irons?

In previous years the Blueprint irons were a thin blade design, with only one variation. The two Blueprint iron options of 2024 offers players great choice between a blade and the more forgiving i230 irons.

Ping Blueprint Irons review

What Ping drivers do the pros use?

Ping staffers tend to favour the brand’s range of blade irons, such as the Ping i230, i525 irons, Blueprint S and Blueprint T irons.

This is because elite players don’t require as much forgiveness as mid-to-high handicap players, so the Ping G430 isn’t as useful for these tour pros.

Nicola Slater

Nicola Slater

Nicola recently graduated from Stirling University where she studied Sports Studies, she wrote her dissertation on barriers to participation for women in golf.
Nicola plays her golf at Hickleton Golf Club and has recently started her professional career on the LET Access Tour. Having played for Yorkshire Ladies and has represented England at junior and senior level.

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