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Ping Blueprint T Irons Review

Best Irons for Low Handicappers 2024

Are you a low handicapper looking to upgrade your blades? Here’s our list of best irons for low handicappers 2024.

 

For low handicappers, having the right set of irons can make a significant impact on their game. With so many options available in the market, choosing the best irons can be challenging.

In this article, we will be taking a closer look at some of the top irons for low handicappers in 2024. These include new additions for 2024, from brands such as Ping, Wilson and Mizuno.

Each of these irons offers unique features that cater to the specific needs of low handicappers, including enhanced ball control, greater accuracy, and increased distance. 

Best Irons For Low Handicappers 2024


Wilson Staff Model Blades Irons

5 star review
Wilson Staff Model Blades Irons Review

Reviewed by Jack Backhouse

These irons put you on edge. They’re thin and clean and make you wonder whether you are skilful enough to attempt to hit them. I love blades. I have hit pretty much all of them, and these are right up there with the best-looking on the market right now. So far, so good.

Building on what was already an excellent iron in the previous staff model, Wilson have significantly removed some mass in the heel of the club and distributed it around the toe, moving the centre of gravity to where it should be: the centre of the club face. This expands the hitting area, increasing playability and actually making the club more forgiving, which, in a blade, can be quite hard to do.

Out of the centre of the face, these irons are as long as most, and I am pleased with the control I had with them. The 7-iron averaged 166 yards carry at 6466 rpm of backspin, which is perfect. With irons, you want the ball spinning and launching high enough to be able to stop the ball on the greens, and that’s what I got from the Staff Model irons. The 5-iron carry of 193 yards at 129 ball speed was more than I expected, so it feels good to know these clubs are still powerful despite being tiny.

As far as player’s irons go, I am not sure they get much better than these. Wilson have seemed to encapsulate the classic old iron feeling and put that into a new head, with new weighting for the total package. Great looks, plenty of distance, and a soft feel. I could quite happily put these irons in my bag and use them for a season. Wilson have been sneaky good in the last couple of years and this is another big release for them.

Pros:

  • Look so good behind the ball
  • Great feel
  • Low price

Cons:

  • Will not suit slow or inconsistent ball strikers


RRP: £1050 4-PW

7 iron loft: (Degrees) 34

Shafts: True Temper Dynamic Gold Mid 115 Shaft (R/S/X)

More information: Wilson Website

Ping Blueprint T Irons

5 star review
Ping Blueprint T Irons Review

Reviewed by Jack Backhouse

I fell in love with these irons after my first shot. The Blueprint T irons are forged from 8620 carbon steel and just feel so good from the face. I could have continued to hit them long after the test had finished. They didn’t feel harsh and firm like some blades do; the ball felt controlled and spinny from the face, and I liked that.

Our irons testing starts with the 9 iron and I hit five shots that basically landed on top of each other. With a perfect 20-degree launch with 8500rpm of spin, I would be in danger of hitting shots that stop and spin back with these irons, which is something I rarely do. I was impressed at the ball speed and carry these irons produce, for a blade for me 137 yards is pretty solid.

My 5 iron shots carried an average of 185, which is perfect gapping, and again, the Blueprint T irons gave me perfect launch conditions. I really like Ping’s precision milling on the face and grooves, as this really helps me keep the ball up in the air as a natural lowball player.

Overall, I was really impressed with these irons. I knew they would be good in terms of control and workability, but I didn’t know they would feel so good and put out such impressive launch monitor data for a forged blade. These could go straight into my bag as gamers for 2024.

Pros:

  • Great compact-looking golf club
  • Really workable
  • Competitive distance numbers

Cons:

  • Do not miss hit!


RRP: £200 per iron (steel) £210 per iron (graphite)

Shafts: True Temper Dynamic Gold 120 (S300, X100), PING Alta CB Black graphite (SR, R, S)

Optional Stock Shafts: PING AWT (R, S, X), Dynamic Gold (S300, X100), Dynamic Gold 105 (R300, S300), KBS Tour (R, S, X), Nippon N.S. Pro Modus3 105 (R, S, X), Elevate MPH 95 (R, S), UST Recoil Dart 65 (A), 75 (R, S)

Lofts: Standard, Power Spec and Retro Spec

More information: Ping Website

Cobra King Tour Irons

4.5 star review
best irons for low hanidcappers

Reviewed by Jack Backhouse

I am exactly the player that these irons are aimed at. A pretty fast swing, but not really a good enough ball striker to warrant using blades; but desperately disillusioned about my own ability and want to use a players’ iron.

The Cobra King Tour irons are the solution to this mess. They look good enough to fool me into believing I’m a good player but pack enough of a punch in the head to provide the help I need.

You can straight away feel the power in these clubs. Shots seem to shoot from the face despite soft feel from the multi-material heads, I’m not surprised these have gone straight into the bag of Rickie Fowler, a long-time pure blade player.

These irons feature Cobra’s industry-leading 5-step forging process, which allows them to centre the CoG with extreme precision, and makes them feel so soft. On the back of the head, Cobra has placed an aluminium medallion just above a TPU insert which makes the sweet spot bigger and boosts ball speeds on off-centre hits.

PROS

  • Classic-looking iron with a thin top line
  • Fast ball speeds across the face
  • Forgiving on off-centre strikes

CONS

  • Quite a lot of offset for a player’s iron


RRP: £1099 (4-PW)

Lofts: PW 44°, 9i 40°, 8i 36°, 7i 32°, 6i 28°, 5i 25°, 4i 22°, 3i 19°

Shafts: KBS $-Taper (120g)

Grip: Lamkin Crossline (58R) – Black/Silver (48g)

More information: Cobra Website

Callaway Apex MB Irons

5 star review
Callaway Apex MB iron

Reviewed by Jack Backhouse

Unboxing this gift from Callaway was a real treat. I love blades, and they do not come any ‘bladier’ than the new Callaway Apex MB iron. With the thin topline, and the compact blade length, this golf club screams high-level ball striker, and if you are not, then you shouldn’t be holding them.

Behind the ball, they look fantastic. You really feel like you are going to be able to work different ball flights, and I love the dulled chrome finish. The black tungsten weight screw with Apex stamped on it gives you the impression that there is some technology in the head and that it is not just your standard blade. This hasn’t added any unwanted size to the club, so you purists out there can stand down.

The data isn’t impressive in terms of carry and total distance, as I have hit irons this year that get up to 190 yards plus, but it’s the consistency that’s important. The launch angles are pretty tight, the spin is very consistent, there are no surprise long ball speeds, and you just generally get the feeling that you know what is going to happen when you make contact. The player that is considering putting these in the bag are searching for more control and more predictable results, and that is exactly what Callaway Golf offer in these irons.

I am a huge fan of these blade irons, and they are right up there with the irons I’ve most enjoyed hitting this year. Callaway have managed to add some tech features to a very small head that will help your game whilst not ruining the purity of the MB. If you are a good ball striker looking for an upgrade, you should definitely be considering these.

PROS

  • Great feel
  • Sound fantastic
  • Serious sex appeal

CONS

  • Not suitable for inconsistent ball strikers


RRP: £217 per iron

Loft: 7 iron loft – 34 degrees

Shafts: 21 Custom Shafts Available

More information: Callaway Website

Titleist T100 Irons

5 star review
Titleist T100 irons review

Reviewed by Hannah Holden

I love a set of Titleist irons, so I couldn’t wait to get down to Woburn and test the new range earlier this year. The T100 is the smallest model in the T-Series line up and is designed for the better player who wants precision control and an unrivalled feel.

Titleist wanted to be more precise with the centre of gravity (CG) in these models. They have used a 2000° aerospace brazing process to secure the tungsten inside the club head, saving weight as they don’t need to use adhesive, and meaning they can be more precise with weight locations for optimised CG placement. But how has that helped performance?

I noticed a more optimal launch window than I have seen with this model before and a really optimal land angle which is obviously going to help with stopping power and control.

Now obviously these clubs are designed for tour players and better ball strikers so you will notice a drop off in distance on shots that aren’t out of the middle of the face. That is a trade-off for that added level of feel and control you get.

Overall I have really enjoyed testing these irons, and think the short irons will be sneaking into my golf ball for the foreseeable future. I love the fact you can combo between so many models in this range so I can get the control, feel and workability I want in my short irons but get something with a little more ball speed and distance at the top end of my bag.

Pros:

  • Great feel
  • Look great behind the golf ball
  • Excellent control
  • Good distance

Cons:

  • Tour-inspired club so won’t be for everyone.


RRP: £178.50 per steel club or £1,249.50 for a set of 7
£192.50 per graphite club or £1,347.50 for a set of 7

Shafts: 8 Featured shafts

More information: Titleist website

Srixon ZX7 MKII Irons

5 star review
Srixon ZX7 MKII

Reviewed by Jack Backhouse

The ZX7 MKII have big shoes to fill, but I think they’re even better than before. The soft feel you get from a centred hit is so pure you repeatedly hit shots where the ball feels like it weighs nothing.

Srixon have redesigned the back of the club with its new Pureframe, which has an 80% thicker portion of carbon steel right behind the sweet spot, which makes shots not only feel great but perform a lot better too.

The ZX7 MKII delivers really tight dispersions thanks to the minimal offset and tour-inspired head design. I barely hit a shot offline with my averages with the 6 and 8 irons 3.6 and 6 yards away from the centre.

I really liked how consistently the irons spun; each shot felt like I would be able to stop it on the green despite my low launch. Having enough spin allows players to shape the ball both ways and control the flight more, which is essential for good iron play.

They are not the most intimidating clubs to stand over, which is great for how well they feel and play. Often I find that the nicest feeling irons are the most intimidating to stand over, especially in the long irons, but I really like the balance Srixon have struck here.

PROS

  • Great looking compact head
  • Well-controlled flight and spin
  • Pretty long for a tour iron

CONS

  • You know when you have miss hit it, even if the shot isn’t too bad

  • RELATED: Read the full Srixon ZX7 MKII Irons review HERE

RRP: £167 per steel shafted iron, £184 per graphite shafted iron

Lofts: PW 46°, 9i 41°, 8i 36°, 7i 32°, 6i 28°, 5i 25°, 4i 22°

Shafts: N.S. PRO Modus3 Tour 120

More information: Srixon Website

Ping Blueprint S Irons

5 star review
Ping Blueprint S Irons Review

Reviewed by Hannah Holden

This is a great-looking iron. I love the small, compact look and the fact there is really minimal offset. It still has that typical ping shape with the slightly higher toe, but I think that gives this smaller iron a look that isn’t intimidating at all.

There was definitely more forgiveness in these than I expected. I especially liked the fact that even on slightly low-on-the-face strikes, I still got enough distance to get the ball to the green. The consistency of my distance was a lot better than I would have expected with the size of these irons, which is obviously important when you are firing into greens.

These were carrying 126.5 yards on average in my simulator testing, which is a tad shy of the 133 yards I would generally get out of my 9-iron, but nothing that couldn’t be fixed with a slight loft tweak.

Overall, I was really impressed with these irons. I knew they would be good in terms of control and workability, but I was concerned about if they would fly far enough to be potential gamers.

Pros:

  • Great compact-looking golf club
  • Really workable
  • Good forgiveness relative to size

Cons:

  • Just suits the better player market


RRP: £200 per iron (steel) £210 per iron (graphite)

Shafts: True Temper Dynamic Gold 120 (S300, X100), PING Alta CB Black graphite (SR, R, S)

Optional Stock Shafts: PING AWT (R, S, X), Dynamic Gold (S300, X100), Dynamic Gold 105 (R300, S300), KBS Tour (R, S, X), Nippon N.S. Pro Modus3 105 (R, S, X), Elevate MPH 95 (R, S), UST Recoil Dart 65 (A), 75 (R, S)

Lofts: Standard, Power Spec and Retro Spec

More information: Ping Website

TaylorMade P7MB irons

5 star review
irons for low handicappers

Reviewed by Jack Backhouse

Do you believe in love at first sight? Well, you might after getting a glimpse of TaylorMade’s new P7MBs. The contemporary look and design features a thin top line, minimal offset, a super narrow sole and after feedback from Colin Morikawa and Rory McIlroy, TaylorMade have made the head smaller from heel to toe.

The best part about these irons is undoubtedly how they feel. The 1025 Steel is 5X forged by a 2000lb press, which all you need to know makes the centred strikes feel solid. The P7MBs make you want to keep pounding balls on the range so you can get that feedback over and over again.

What is really impressive, however, is the front-to-back dispersion. Front-to-back dispersion is a really important metric for low handicappers and professionals as knowing exactly how far you are going to hit it. Also, knowing the yardage difference between a good and bad strike is going to help make better decisions and hit more greens in regulation.

PROS

  • Heading turning beauty
  • Centre strikes feel so soft
  • Easy to control shape and trajectory

CONS

  • Expect serious feedback through the hands on poor strikes.


RRP: £165 per iron

Lofts: 3i – 20°, 4i – 23°, 5i – 26°, 6i – 30°, 7i – 34°, 8i – 39°, 9i – 42.5°, P – 47°

Shaft: KBS Tour – S, X

More information: TaylorMade Website

Mizuno Pro 241 irons

5 star review
Mizuno Pro 241 Irons Review

Reviewed by Jack Backhouse

For a long time, Mizuno has known how to make a good-looking blade, but in the last few years, they have become top performers across the board. We have all had a set of Mizuno irons in the past; I had a set of MP-32 irons, which were a gift from the lowest handicapper in the club when he upgraded. I couldn’t hit them, but they were absolutely beautiful. I have had a soft spot for Mizuno irons ever since.

Putting the club down behind the ball, you notice one of the big changes in this new lineup. Following feedback from their tour players, Mizuno have shortened the blade length on the short irons, making them even smaller than before! I like this as they feel like precision medical tools, not heavy-duty weapons. The Pro 241 is once again made from forged one-piece grain flow forged 1025E steel and still has that soft copper underlay that makes these irons feel like no other.

The club’s centre of mass has been moved in the head so that centred strikes feel softer but more powerful than the previous irons. They felt really strong for a blade. I spent a bit of time away from the launch monitor just having fun shaping shots, holding the ball up into the wind and controlling trajectories, and this is where you feel the full benefit of the Mizuno. The strikes felt fabulous, and the ball was really easy to manipulate.

If you’re not looking for a full set of blades, there are more models in the Mizuno Pro lineup that you might consider split setting with. The Mizuno Pro 241, 243, and 245 irons all offer different characteristics to help optimize your iron play.

PROS

  • Look so good behind the ball
  • Nothing feels like a Mizuno
  • Super consistent launch conditions

CONS

  • Will not suit slow or inconsistent ball strikers


RRP: £1299 4-PW

7 iron loft: (Degrees) 34

Shafts: 24 custom shafts available

More information: Mizuno Website

Titleist T150 Irons

5 star review
Titleist T150 iron review

Reviewed by Hannah Holden

The T150 is a brand new model in the T-Series lineup, which comes into replace the T100 S, which was a stronger lofted version of the T100. Titleist recognised a lot of golfers appreciated the extra distance this model provided but would have liked an element of added forgiveness compared to the T100. They have worked on this a come back with the new T150 to deliver on that.

I love the fact that this T150 model looks almost identical to the T100 offering, so you still really have that tour player look, but you get the bonus of some added distance and forgiveness.

On average these carried 6 yards further than the T100 model which is just over half a club longer for me. The distance is very similar to what I saw with my previous T100S irons where I would have expected to carry my 7-iron 155 yards.

Overall I have really enjoyed testing these irons, and I think these T150 mid and long irons will be sneaking into my golf ball for the foreseeable future. I love the fact you can combo between so many models in this range so I can get the control, feel and workability I want in my short irons but get something with a little more ball speed and distance at the top end of my bag.

Pros:

  • Great feel
  • Look great behind the golf ball
  • Excellent control
  • Good distance

Cons:

  • Tour-inspired club so won’t be for everyone.


RRP: £178.50 per steel club or £1,249.50 for a set of 7
£192.50 per graphite club or £1,347.50 for a set of 7

Shafts: 8 Featured shafts

More information: Titleist website


Best Irons for Low Handicappers 2024

Finding the right set of irons is crucial for low handicappers looking to take their game to the next level. With top brands like Cobra, Srixon, TaylorMade, and Mizuno offering specialised irons in 2024, low handicappers have plenty of options to choose from.

Alongside freshing your irons this season check out our…

How do we test irons?

At National Club Golfer we are passionate about producing accurate and thorough reviews and make sure our testing process is rigorous so we get a good understanding of how each club performs.

Each iron is hit with TaylorMade TP5 golf balls to allow us to collect launch monitor data with our in-house TrackMan and Flightscope. After this, it is time to head out onto the golf course and test the clubs in practice and competition play. We do this across various golf clubs in our base of Yorkshire.

What is important when buying a new set of irons?

When buying a new set of irons, it is important to know what you want from the clubs to help you improve.

Most people are looking for more distance, each iron model is optimised for different things. Depending on your swing and your impact conditions, you may not actually hit the model that is advertised as the longest, the furthest. So if you want more distance it is always worth giving different models a hit before you make a decision.

For most golfers, especially high handicappers, something that is more forgiving is going to yield the best performance. Most forgiving golf irons have a slightly bigger club head with perimeter weighting for high MOI. Cavity backed irons also have a center of gravity that is further back to help players get more height on their shots.

If you are a low handicapper, you probably are not looking for distance or forgiveness but a superb feel and more predictable shots. irons for low handicappers tend to sit smaller behind the ball, are forged irons and have more loft for a more consistent ball speed.

Don’t forget about the shaft either. Getting the correct shaft can help dial in your spin, launch angle and can also give you some extra distance. Having a club fitting or trying different options with your local pro can really improve the performance of your new irons.

Why You’re NOT Striking Your Irons Properly

striking your irons well is a vital ingredient to improving your golf and being a good player. It is very rare you see a top player miss-hit a ball. Understanding what should happen at impact and then getting your head around the mechanics that allow that to happen is a huge step towards shooting better scores.

Check out this video where Equipment Editor Hannah Holden and PGA Professional Jack Backhouse go through some drills you can do to start getting better.

5 Tips to Break 70

If you’re looking at the list of best irons for low handicappers 2023, you must be a single-digit handicap golfer looking to break through and shoot a score in the 60s. have a look at a video Hannah Holden made with PGA Pro Jack Backhouse on 5 tips you can use to break 70.

Nicola Slater

Nicola Slater

Nicola recently graduated from Stirling University where she studied Sports Studies, she wrote her dissertation on barriers to participation for women in golf.
Nicola plays her golf at Hickleton Golf Club and has recently started her professional career on the LET Access Tour. Having played for Yorkshire Ladies and has represented England at junior and senior level.

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