There are no great players with a bad grip, well maybe there is one now.

If a club golfer came along to most PGA professionals holding the club like our newly crowned Masters champion the pro would want to alter the player’s grip. Why?

How Jordan Spieth became a Major champion

Because Spieth’s hands do not match each other, the palms don’t face each other.

His left hand is leaning towards a slice hold and the right a hook hold with the added complication of some odd combination of interlocking and reverse overlapping going on between his fore finger left hand and pinkie on his right hand.

Such a grip has loss of control over the club face written all over it.

What clubs Jordan Spieth used to win the Masters

Most players holding the club like this would have shots flying both left and right willy nilly.

So why doesn’t Jordan? Well, let’s be honest, he does hit quite a few both ways and his putting was extraordinary at Augusta, so that blew the field away.

Having looked at photographs of a young Spieth he has always had this unorthodox grip and generally controls the club face square to the ball through impact by being able to hold off the release and rotation of his right hand.
I believe, had someone caught him at Augusta, or his putting had slipped, his game may well have deserted him over the back nine He does this by being phenomenally strong in his left wrist and forearm which allows him to pull the club through the hitting area with his left arm leading and left elbow buckling, a little reminiscent of Lee Westwood, or most other players bunker action.

The downside of such a method is undoubtedly a reduction in power, Spieth is not a long hitter, and if his timing or co-ordination wavers he will play army golf. Left, right, left right, left.

It may seem churlish, but, I believe, had someone caught him at Augusta, or his putting had slipped, his game may well have deserted him over the back nine.

That said, he has a remarkable, unorthodox talent and is a delightful, articulate young man.

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Gary Alliss is a PGA Master Professional, coach of the Slovak Republic National Team, he is also a development consultant to the R&A. For more visit www.allissgolfacademy.co.uk