Chris Lloyd: How the slow players beat the system

The Scoop

Our tour-rookie columnist on annoying slow play and how the culprits get away with it

The topic of slow play never tends to go away and I personally don’t really see how hard it is for some players to get a move on.

It suits me to play faster and if I’m with two quick players the chances are I’ll play OK.

Sometimes you have a group in front who are a bit slow but there is nothing more frustrating than having a playing partner who is always double-checking their club or the reading of a putt.

My set routine is one practice swing and then hit it. On the green I will have a look from whatever angle I need to and then hit the putt.

I have never really taken a practice stroke with the putter and it seems to work for me.

A lot of it is massive common sense and being ready to play when it’s your turn.
The topic of slow play never tends to go away and I personally don’t really see how hard it is for some players to get a move on. However, it is very hard to govern as, if a player is slow, they then quicken up when the referee turns up and the other players can get the blame and possibly be fined.

So many players have perfected the art of having two routines, one for the referee and one without.

It is so hard to keep on top of, and players do have off days which doesn’t help things.

I don’t pay much attention to what my playing partners are doing other than on a par 3 or on the greens and that also helps.

You get warned and, if you do get a bad time, you’ll then be fined. I think the first number they dish out is a €2,000 fine so that will certainly get your attention.

There was one occasion last year with two French players who racked up about €19,000 and I’m still not sure they got the point.

  • Chris Lloyd, from Bristol, is a rookie on the European Tour having come through Qualifying School
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