Quick 9: The most bizarre moments at The Open

History

To say anything can happen at The Open is no exaggeration. Keel Timmins rounds up the most interesting anecdotes from down the years

There have been plenty of bizarre moments at The Open down the years. Here are our favourites…

9. Nick Faldo, 1987 Muirfield

Paul Azinger led going into the final round of the 1987 Open at Muirfield, while Nick Faldo was just a shot adrift alongside David Frost.

In tough misty conditions, Faldo incredibly parred every single hole to get into the clubhouse at five-under.

In the final group, Azinger bogeyed each of the final two holes to see his three-shot lead at the turn disappear and eventually lose by a shot to the consistent Englishman.

8. Richard Boxall, 1991 Royal Birkdale

Richard Boxall – now a Sky Sports Golf commentator – was well positioned in the 1991 Open at Royal Birkdale, despite complaining of ‘twinges’ in his left leg.

In the third round, the Englishman came to the ninth tee just three shots off the lead. After he hit his 1-iron, he collapsed to the floor after hearing a snap. Sure enough, his left leg had broken and he wouldn’t play golf again for ten months.

Afterwards, he joked: “It’s amazing the extremes you’ll go to not play with Colin Montgomerie.”

7. Ian Woosnam, 2001 Royal Lytham & St Annes

After making a birdie at the first hole in the final round, Ian Woosnam was readying himself for a charge at the title. That was until the second tee when caddie Miles Byrne found out that he had forgot to take out the extra driver that Woosnam was hitting in practice.

As a result, the Welshman had 15 clubs in his bag. An eventual two-shot penalty would cost him outright second place.

Two weeks later, Woosnam sacked Byrne for turning up late to the first tee at the Volvo Scandinavian Masters.

Woosnam said: “You know what the circumstances are going to be this time, I don’t know where he is. I gave him a chance, I don’t ask for much. He had one warning, that was it.”

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