Breaking down the the Masters by numbers

History

Golf historian and author Alun Evans breaks down the figures behind Augusta National.

1934

The Masters is the youngest of the four Majors, with the first tournament held at Augusta in 1934. Horton Smith won the inaugural tournament by one shot with a total score of 284, -4.

54

Jack Burke Jr holds the title of greatest comeback at the Masters after 54 holes. He was eight shots off the lead in 1956 but rallied to claim victory. Gary Player’s seven-shot turnaround in 1978 is a close second place.

63

Nick Price and Greg Norman jointly hold the record for the lowest score at the Masters.

Greg Norman

22

Jack Nicklaus’s top-10 finishes in the Masters – a record and it is also the most top-10 places he picked up in all of the four Majors.

270

Americans Tiger Woods (1997) and Jordan Spieth (2015) hold the honour of the lowest 72-hole total at the Masters. The two superstars recorded -18 totals.

Jordan Spieth, Masters

1997

Woods is the undisputed leader when it comes to largest winning margin. The 14-time Major winner’s 12-stroke victory in 1997 puts him well ahead of Jack Nicklaus’ nine-shot win in 1965. Woods was in unstoppable form in 1997, producing a winning score of -18, well ahead of Tom Kite’s -6.

Three

Jack Nicklaus (1965 and 1966), Nick Faldo (1989 and 1990) and Tiger Woods (2001 and 2002) are the only men to win back-to-back Masters tournaments.

Hall of Fame

46

Nicklaus holds the distinction of being the oldest Masters champion. The Golden Bear was 46 years, two months and 23 days old when he won his sixth and final green jacket in 1986. In second is Ben Crenshaw after he claimed his second Masters crown in 1995, aged 43.

Tiger Woods, Masters

59

American golfers unsurprisingly leads the way in number of wins, followed some way off by South Africa (5), Spain (4) and England (3).

Masters winners

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