Which golf ball should you be putting into play this season?

Picking the right golf ball for your game is essential for getting optimum performance. Titleist golf balls take up a huge portion of the market, but have you looked at all the models available? We’ve put the Titleist Tour Soft golf balls and the Titleist Tour Speed golf balls head to head so you can see which will help your performance.

Titleist Tour Soft vs Tour Speed Golf Balls: NCG Verdict

Looks

The Titleist Tour Soft and Tour Speed both look very similar to one another. This comes down to the fact they both have the same dimple pattern and outer cover. Each have a white and yellow colourway option.

Really the only visually difference between these models is the logo.
The Titleist Tour Speed logo is encased with two lines with arrows at either end to help with alignment. Whilst the Titleist Tour Soft ball has an interesting design surrounding the logo, which includes a perpendicular line to create a T-formation.

Personally, I think this can really help with squaring the club face up relative to your aim point and is probably the most performance enhancing of the two models available.

Feel

The Titleist Tour Soft feels much softer than the Titleist Tour Speed on impact. I especially noticed its softness around the greens whilst chipping.

I really liked having this soft feel when hitting short sided chips and high flop shots around the green as I felt it gave me a lot more control.

The only issue with this softness for me was putting. I had to hit my long putts much harder to get them to roll out to the hole.

I did find that although the Tour Speed didn’t feel as soft it gave me more short-game spin from clean lies.

Titleist Tour Soft golf balls

Distance

When looking at the trackman data to compare the two balls I was mainly focusing my driving distance.

The Tour Speed was carrying on average 7 yards further than the Tour Soft. This was also reflected in the total carry distance.

When we moved into the mid-irons again I was getting 6-8 yards more carry out of my 7-iron with the Titleist Tour Speed. But in terms of total distance, there wasn’t much difference between the two golf balls.

Once I got down into my wedges, the distance difference was negligible. In fact, when I got down to three-quarter pitch shots both balls were carrying the same distance.

Spin

I did not find a massive difference in spin between the Tour Soft or the Tour Speed.

In my longer clubs, the Tour Soft was spinning around 100rpm more, however, when I got down to my wedges this switched and the Tour Speed spun 50 rpm more. But really this is a barely noticeable difference.

It was noticeable that I had more control and spin with the Tour Speed around the greens when chipping though.

Price

A box of Titleist Tour Speed golf balls are a little more expensive sitting at £38 compared to the a box of the Titleist Tour Soft golf balls at £32.

Titleist Tour Soft vs Tour Speed Golf Balls: NGC Summary

It was really interesting to see the differences between these two Titleist models.

The Titleist Tour Soft golf balls are great if you are looking for that extra control and softness around the greens without splurging on a high-performance ball.

The Titleist Tour Speed golf balls are a great option if you want to gain distance off the tee, have a penetrating stable flight and still maintain short game spin.

Both golf balls are great mid-range options depending on the goals you are trying to achieve in your game.

More information: Titleist website

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Hannah Screen

Hannah Screen has recently turned professional after a successful amateur career, she has represented England at junior and ladies' levels and played golf for the University of Oklahoma. She recently graduated with a degree in journalism and is currently splitting her time playing tournament golf, and testing golf equipment, mainly golf balls.

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