The best golf shot-tracking systems for 2018

Golf Equipment

Fancy tracking your stats and identifying where you need to improve over winter? Equipment editor James Savage picks out five of the top devices on the market

Which are the best golf shot-tracking systems on the market at the moment?

Myself and the team at National Club Golfer have been testing a few out over the past few months so we thought we’d round up the pros and cons of each device to help you make the right purchase.

Each of these products have also been individually reviewed so click on the links to read more.

Best golf shot-tracking systems: Shot Scope V2

Best golf shot-tracking systems

How it works: The first Shot Scope was effectively a band but V2 is also a GPS watch.

This is a significant upgrade. The ease of use of the original is maintained – so you still don’t have to worry about tagging clubs if you are tracking a round.

But now you’ll get front, middle and back yardages and you also have the ability simply to use the V2 as a GPS device on its own. You don’t necessarily have to track your round.

In fact, it has three modes – GPS, Pro, which gathers performance data and doesn’t show yardages, and GPS+Track, which combines the other two.

The watch works by sensing the tag during a swing. It can even tell the difference between a practice swing and an actual shot.

All you do during a round is record the number of putts you have on each hole and you do this by the flag so the device can note the pin position.

Then sync the wristband on your phone or desktop after play and receive round stats within seconds.

Pros: Sometimes the first version would dig into my wrist as I made a swing and, while it wasn’t painful, it could be a bit distracting.

The softer edges on the V2, though, removes this entirely. I’d actually forgotten I was wearing it as the round progressed. Given that I normally hate wearing watches of any sort, that has to be a big tick.

The set up process remains exactly the same – download the app to your phone or desktop, put the tags in the end of your clubs, download the course you are going to play and off you go.

I tested the V2 in tandem with a Nikon rangefinder to get exact yardages. The GPS was very accurate and I grew in confidence as the rounds passed that the information was reliable and trustworthy.

Cons: You have to tell the wristband how many putts you’ve had on every green. And some players won’t like wearing something on their wrist.

SRP: £169

Click here to read our full review.

More information can be found on the Shot Scope website.

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