Puerto de Hierro (Arriba)

Puerto de Hierro (Arriba)

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Course Information

Puerto de Hierro, which owes its name to the nearby iron memorial arch, was founded in 1895 as a polo club by a group of prominent Spanish nobles  with avid from the then King of Spain, Alfonso XIII.

In 1904, the club commissioned Tom Simpson designed what was mainland Spain’s first course, the Arriba (Upper). Harry Colt made some alterations two decades later – not a bad combination.

In 1966 the club added a second course, the Abajo (Lower), with Robert Trent Jones the architect – and it is a very fine venue in its own right, with some believing it at least the match of the Arribas.

Set down on an undulating property 10 minutes away from Madrid city centre, it boasts a very tough set of par 4s and a hard finish which makes it the better players’ choice.

The club has an incredible history, not least when Edward VIII visited Madrid as the Duke of Windsor in 1940, staying at the club’s adjoining Ritz Hotel in order to negotiate possible alliances with Nazi Germany from Axis-leaning Spain.

During that visit the Duke spent a day at Puerta de Hierro. The Duke returned to the club on several occasions, most notably in 1960 when he famously played golf under pouring rain

The routing not might not be as good as on the Arriba, but it gains marks for being more demanding.

Set down on an undulating property 10 minutes away from Madrid city centre, it boasts a very tough set of par 4s and a hard finish which makes it the better players’ choice.

The Abajo is famous for its routing, terrific par 3s and excellent greens. Both courses have outstanding maintenance. Chris Bertram

 

Information

Tom Simpson, Harry Colt

+34 91 316 17 45

Avda. de Miraflores , Madrid , Spain , 28035