Debate: Was this Lefty’s last chance to win the US Open?

The Scoop

Has the left-hander blown his final chance of US Open glory? Two of our writers argue the toss...

YES

He’s ageing and no longer has what it takes, writes Joe Harrison

It is no secret that the US Open means more to Phil Mickelson than any other tournament.

And after a sixth career second-place finish, it now appears that he might forever be left wanting.

Having clung onto the lead for the first three rounds, it looked like this would be the year for Phil to finally break his duck.

It seemed even more likely after his miraculous pitch-in eagle at the 10th – reminiscent in its brilliance to his 6-iron from the pine-trees at the 2010 Masters.

But as he made his way up the back nine, he threw it away. Again.

What was most alarming about this collapse was that it was poor wedge shots – usually the American’s bread and butter – at the 13th and 15th that effectively handed Rose the trophy.

He simply cracked under the pressure and his strengths let him down, which hardly stands him in good stead to break that winless streak.
He simply cracked under the pressure and his strengths let him down, which hardly stands him in good stead to break that winless streak.

NO

It may have been his best chance, but you can never rule him out, says James Tompkinson

Following the final round at Merion, Phil Mickelson claimed that he would never have a better chance of winning the US Open.

Few could argue that this, but in no way does it mean he will never triumph.

How many Major winners end up prevailing on their ‘best chance’ anyway? I’m pretty sure if you asked Ernie Els, he wouldn’t have put The 2012 Open at Lytham down as his best chance to win The Open, yet he found himself walking away with the Claret Jug.

Mickelson is an outstanding golfer, and although Merion may have been his best chance to win the US Open, there is no way you can completely rule him out – he’s just too good.

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