Latest Review: Motocaddy M1 Pro

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This compact trolley now fits into the boot of a car.

Electric trolleys were once the preserve of the seasoned golfer – now the benefits to us all of conserving energy to hit shots have become obvious. Some of us remained resolute carriers due to the sheer fiddliness of the alternative while others were put off due to a lack of boot and/or storage space.

Now there really is no excuse – the new M1 Pro comprehensively removes all of those concerns. 

As stylish as it looks when assembled, what sets the M1 Pro apart is how compact it is folded up and – just as crucially – how quick and easy it is to go from the one position to the other.

A simple, numbered system tells you exactly what to do next – you work from 1 to 5 and all you need to do is find the next yellow tab to proceed. After your game, exactly the reverse is the case. You can then easily pick up the trolley using the handle.

This is not an all-singing kind of trolley – Motocaddy’s S3 range does that – rather it is simple to use and lightweight. Take it from me that the system is (almost) idiot-proof. I did give it a dry run at home, assembling and folding the trolley using the instruction booklet but I won’t pretend I wasn’t a touch anxious arriving at a course hundreds of miles away knowing that if I couldn’t repeat the process I would have a large bag to lump round for the next three days – but I needn’t have worried.

This is not an all-singing kind of trolley – Motocaddy’s S3 range does that – rather it is simple to use and lightweight. There’s only one button, which you press to turn it on or off and twist to increase or decrease the speed.

Once finished, the only part of the folding process I got briefly wrong was the folding of the wishbone but it is satisfying when it all clicks into place and you can pop it back in the boot. 

In summary, I can successfully operate the M1 Pro, and that means you can too.
Motocaddy M1 Pro

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